Category Archives: Kingdom

POLITICS AND TWO-KINGDOM THEOLOGY

PMW 2018-016 by Larry E. Ball

Gentry introduction:
This is an excellent, short article on the dangers of Two-kingdom Theology. TKT is very much opposed to postmillennialism and to theonomic ethics. In this quick insight into TKT we can see the very obvious negative implications of this theology.

When I recently read the post about Andrew White, a PCA elder and a democratic candidate for the Governor of Texas (The Aquila Report, January 26), I was disheartened, to say the least. What bothered me most is that he seemed to imply that since both abortion and homosexual marriage are the law of the land, they must be right and good in a democratic society. Continue reading

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“FIRST THE BLADE”

PMW-2017-090 by R. J. Rushdoony (Chalcedon Foundation)

One of the very important and much neglected verses of Scripture is Mark 4:28: “For the earth bringeth forth fruit of herself: first the blade, then the ear, after that the full corn in the ear.” Our Lord tells us (Mark 4:26-29) that the Kingdom of God, as it develops in history, has a necessary growth and development. No more than we can plant grain and then expect the harvest at once, can we expect quick or immediate results in the growth of God’s Kingdom. If we plant grain, we must cultivate it, often water it, tend to the field, and, only after much labor, reap a harvest. To expect otherwise is stupidity and foolishness, whether in farming or in the work of the Kingdom. In fact, our Lord describes quick growth as false (Matt. 13:5-6, 20-21). Continue reading

PRACTICING POSTMILLENNIALISM (3)

PMT 2017-042 by Jeffery J. Ventrella, J.D.

This is the third installment in the series. In this issue we will highlight:

Cultivating Christendomic Consciousness

Theonomic postmillennialism also demands that one cultivate Christendomic consciousness. God has promised to redeem “a people”consecrated for His purposes. This coming reality will progress in history (“living stones” fitted together to form a “New Temple”) and will climax as an eschatological collective (the Bride, the New Jerusalem, etc.). Accordingly therefore, to live consistently with these coming eschatological realities requires Christians intentionally to develop an awareness for God’s present Christendomic work in, among, with, and through His people. Continue reading