Category Archives: Christ

OUR CHRISTMAS HYMNS ARE POSTMILLENNIAL

PMT 2019-104 by Isaac Arthur of Blue Banner Media

[Note: This (partial) article is reposted from the November 29, 2011 Blue Banner Media blogsite. It is an excellent article showing the inherent hope-filled expectations in many of our traditional Christmas hymns. The postmillennial outlook in these beloved hymns is overlooked by most Christians who sing them today. But since this is Christmas season, I thought it might be helpful to point my readers to this article. I will cite only the opening of the article, then provide a hyperlink to re-direct you to the full article. I hope you will read the whole article. Then sing these Christmas carols with greater understanding.]

R.J. Rushdoony, in his book Institutes of Biblical Law: Volume 1 points out that, “The joyful news of the birth of Christ is the restoration of man to his original calling with the assurance of victory. This has long been celebrated in Christmas carols… The cultural mandate [i.e. fulfilling the Dominion Mandate (Genesis 1:26-28) and the Great Commission (Matthew 28:18-20)] and postmillennialism is either explicit or implicit in Christmas carols.” Continue reading

A POSTMILLENNIAL CHRISTMAS

PMW 2019-103 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

Christmas is upon us, and quite appropriately it will be followed by a new year. Since Christ came to effect a new creation!

We must not forget the message of Christmas; we must take it with us in the new year God is granting us. So as we enter this season, let us consider the postmillennial hope embedded in Christmas. Unless my memory fails me, Bing Crosby sang: “I’m Dreaming of a Postmillennial Christmas.” If he did not, he should have! Whereas Elvis was apparently an amillennialist when he sang: “I’ll Have a Blue Christmas.” Which might explain the howling of the Jordanaires in the background of this song.

Postmillennialists can easily use Christmas texts to present the postmillennial hope. Continue reading

THE NATURE OF THE RESURRECTION

PMW 2019-046 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

The Scripture teaches that Christ arises from the dead in the same body in which he dies, though with certain super-added spiritual powers.1 His resurrection does not merely revivify a lifeless cadaver; but neither is it the creation of a new body. Just as he prophesies, the very body which dies also comes forth from the tomb (Jn 2:19, 22). As such, it miraculously attests the truth of his divine mission on earth (Jn 2:18–21; cp. Mt 12:39–41; 16:1–4; Lk 11:29.

This is why the tomb and burial clothing are empty: his physical body departs from them (Mt 28:6; Jn 20:4–11, 15). After the resurrection the Gospels show Christ in a material body that people can touch and handle (Lk 24:39), and which still has the wounds of the cross (Jn 20:27; cf. Rev 5:6). On other occasions he bids Mary Magdalene to quit clinging (haptomai) to him (Jn 20:17). Continue reading

DANIEL 7:13, MARK 9:1, AND ESCHATOLOGY (4)

PMW 2019-020 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

I finally come to my last article in this four-part series. I have been explaining the significance of Daniel 7:13 for Jesus’ eschatological teaching as recorded in Mark’s Gospel.

My first three articles dealt with the meaning of Daniel 7:13 (it is an enthronement vision for the Son of Man), the influence of this verse on Jesus’ teaching in Mark (at Mark 13:26; 16:24), its backdrop for Mark 9:1 (indirect, but certain), and the expectation regarding when it will be dramatically demonstrated (in the first century while the Sanhedrin and several of the disciples are still alive). Continue reading

DANIEL 7:13, MARK 9:1, AND ESCHATOLOGY (3)

PMW 2019-019 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

I am engaged in a short series on the use of Daniel 7:13 by Jesus in Mark, particularly regarding its influence on Jesus’ statement in Mark 9:1.

In the first article I focused on the meaning of Daniel 7:13, which is widely misunderstood among evangelicals today. It is an enthronement vision that shows Christ entering into heaven to receive his kingdom. It does not refer to Jesus’ Second Coming to earth, as so many believe. The language itself will not allow it, for it says the Son of Man “came up to the Acient of Days / And was presented before Him.”

In my second article I dealt with the use of Daniel 7:13 in three key eschatological texts in Mark’s record of Christ’s teaching. Those verses include Mark 13:26 (in the Olivet Discourse) and 14:62 (Jesus’ statement before the high priest during his trial). Continue reading

DANIEL 7:13, MARK 9:1, AND ESCHATOLOGY (2)

PMW 20199-018 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

In my last article I began a brief series on the influence of Daniel 7:13 on Mark 9:1. In that article I covered only one point of my six-step argument. I dealt with the vitally important issue of “The Meaning of Daniel 7:13 in Prophecy.”

I noted that, despite the great familiarity of this verse to most Christians, more often than not it is woefully misunderstood and misapplied by evangelical pastors and laymen. I argued that it does not speak of Jesus’ Second Coming back to earth at the end of history. Rather, it is an enthronement vision picturing Christ entering into heaven before God to receive authority and a kingdom.

With this interpretation in mind, I have laid the basic foundation for understanding Jesus’ use of it. But now, let us continue. Continue reading

DANIEL 7:13, MARK 9:1, AND ESCHATOLOGY (1)

PMW 2019-017 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

Daniel 7:13 is one of the most powerful eschatological statements in all of Scripture. And yet it is also one of the most misunderstood passages in popular Christian thought. A proper understanding of this verse — and it’s link to Daniel 7:14 — should go a long way in promoting a truly biblical eschatology. In this article I will provide a brief introduction to Daniel 7:13 — as it relates to Jesus’ eschatological teaching in Mark. I will focus especially on his prophetic statement in Mark 9:1.

Unfortunately, not only is Daniel 7:13 widely misunderstood by evangelical laymen, but Mark 9:1 is almost universally misunderstood by liberal biblical scholars. It is one of the passages used the most in attempting to undermine Jesus’ credibility (for instance, see Bertrand Russell’s, Why I am Not a Christian). Continue reading