Category Archives: Christ

JESUS’ BODY IN HYPER-PRETERISM (2)

PMW 2018-097 by Samuel M. Frost, Th. M. (Vigilate et Orate)

Gentry note: This series’ original title was “The Body of the Son of Man.” It was written by former Hyper-preterist, Sam Frost. Sam’s observations in this series show the heretical mutations occurring in the Hyper-preterist movement. This is the second in the two-part series. As Sam’s website urges: “Vigilate et Orate” (“Watch and Pray”). I recommend his site for helpful articles exposing Hyper-preterism.

Since writing the first part of this series, considerable conversations happened on Facebook. The agreements are overwhelming, but the small band of Full Preterists demonstrated an almost total lack of understanding of even the basics of what Christianity discusses under the subject of Christology – the careful study of just who this Jesus fellow is. Continue reading

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JESUS’ BODY IN HYPER-PRETERISM (1)

PMW 2018-096 by Samuel M. Frost, Th. M. (Vigilate et Orate)

Gentry note: This series’ original title was “The Body of the Son of Man.” It was written by former Hyper-preterist, Sam Frost. Sam’s observations in this series show the heretical mutations occurring in the Hyper-preterist movement. As Sam’s website urges: “Vigilate et Orate” (“Watch and Pray”). I recommend his site for helpful articles exposing Hyper-preterism.

According to the Gospel of John, Jesus, the man, was raised and glorified the morning of his resurrection. John has no ascension scene at the end of his Gospel. I believe this simple proposition can be more than adequately deduced from his Gospel. Continue reading

WHAT DOES “THE SON OF MAN” MEAN?

PMW 2018-085 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

During his earthly ministry, Jesus repeatedly refers to himself as “the son of man” (Matt. 8:20; 9:6; 10:23; 11:19; 12:8; etc.). But what does this self-designation mean? How is it used in the Gospels?

As we consider this phrase in the Gospels, we must keep three important issues in mind: (1) Jesus is the only one who ever uses this phrase. Never do his disciples, the Jews, or anyone else mention it. (2) The phrase is always used with the definite article: “the son of man” (3) In Matthew’s Gospel, Jesus himself does not even begin using it until Matt. 8:20. Each of these points is significant. Continue reading

UNHITCHING JESUS FROM THE OT?

PMW 2018-049 by Stephen Altrogge (The Blazing Center)

Gentry note: One of the evangelical tragedies of our times is the dismissal of the Old Testament, as if it were God’s word emeritus. Too many in the contemporary church are preaching a truncated gospel based on a truncated Bible. Andy Stanley, son of famous Baptist pastor Charles Stanley, became a tragic case-in-point when he recently declared himself unhitched from the Old Testament. Stephen Altrogge demonstrates the faulty logic of such a declaration in his amusing expose of Stanley’s error.

Following the advice of pastor Andy Stanley, I just unhitched Jesus from the Old Testament. Boy does it ever feel good to be rid of that old thing. It totally cluttered up the first 2/3 of my Bible. And really, it was so irrelevant to modern Christians, am I right?

Plus, have you ever tried to find the book of Habakkuk? It’s like trying to find a needle in a stack of needles, which I can tell you from experience is extraordinarily painful. Continue reading

OUR CHRISTMAS HYMNS ARE POSTMILLENNIAL

PMT 2017-102 by Isaac Arthur of Blue Banner Media

[Note: This (partial) article is reposted from the November 29, 2011 Blue Banner Media blogsite. It is an excellent article showing the inherent hope-filled expectations in many of our traditional Christmas hymns. The postmillennial outlook in these beloved hymns is overlooked by most Christians who sing them today. But since this is Christmas season, I thought it might be helpful to point my readers to this article. I will cite only the opening of the article, then provide a hyperlink to re-direct you to the full article. I hope you will read the whole article. Then sing these Christmas carols with greater understanding.]

R.J. Rushdoony, in his book Institutes of Biblical Law: Volume 1 points out that, “The joyful news of the birth of Christ is the restoration of man to his original calling with the assurance of victory. This has long been celebrated in Christmas carols… The cultural mandate [i.e. fulfilling the Dominion Mandate (Genesis 1:26-28) and the Great Commission (Matthew 28:18-20)] and postmillennialism is either explicit or implicit in Christmas carols.” Continue reading

REFLECTING ON THE KING’S BIRTH

PMW 2017-101 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

If you reading this at its original posting: Merry Christmas! If not, then Happy New Year! Unless you are way late, then Happy Birthday ( perhaps).

The original Christmas was a time that fully anticipated the postmillennial hope in history. Not only are many of our Christmas hymns very postmillennial, but they are so because the biblical narrative presenting Christ’s birth is! Continue reading

A POSTMILLENNIAL CHRISTMAS

PMW 2017-099 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

Christmas is upon us, and quite appropriately it will be followed by a new year. Since Christ came to effect a new creation!

We must not forget the message of Christmas; we must take it with us in the new year God is granting us. So as we enter this season, let us consider the postmillennial hope embedded in Christmas. Unless my memory fails me, Bing Crosby sang: “I’m Dreaming of a Postmillennial Christmas.” If he did not, he should have! Whereas Elvis was apparently an amillennialist when he sang: “I’ll Have a Blue Christmas.” Which might explain the howling of the Jordanaires in the background of this song.

Postmillennialists can easily use Christmas texts to present the postmillennial hope. Continue reading