Category Archives: Olivet Discourse

DANIEL 7:13, MARK 9:1, AND ESCHATOLOGY (3)

PMW 2019-019 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

I am engaged in a short series on the use of Daniel 7:13 by Jesus in Mark, particularly regarding its influence on Jesus’ statement in Mark 9:1.

In the first article I focused on the meaning of Daniel 7:13, which is widely misunderstood among evangelicals today. It is an enthronement vision that shows Christ entering into heaven to receive his kingdom. It does not refer to Jesus’ Second Coming to earth, as so many believe. The language itself will not allow it, for it says the Son of Man “came up to the Acient of Days / And was presented before Him.”

In my second article I dealt with the use of Daniel 7:13 in three key eschatological texts in Mark’s record of Christ’s teaching. Those verses include Mark 13:26 (in the Olivet Discourse) and 14:62 (Jesus’ statement before the high priest during his trial). Continue reading

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ORTHODOX PRETERIST DANIEL COMMENTARY

PMW 2019-012 by Various Authors

For all those interested in eschatology, three biblical texts stand out as essential for our study: Daniel, the Olivet Discourse, and Revelation. I have written a commentary on Revelation (which should be available this Spring, 2019). I am writing a commentary on the Olivet Discourse in context, covering Matthew 21–25 (which should be available in early 2019). But regarding Daniel, I have only written a brief commentary on Daniel 9 (which is available in my book Perilous Times).

Thus, I am pleased to announce the publication of Jay Rogers’, In the Days of These Kings: The Book of Daniel in Preterist Perspective (740 pages). Rogers’ work is a fully-orthodox preterist analysis of Daniel. I highly recommend this book to my readership. Thus, in this blog article, I will list the endorsements to In the Days of These Kings, which I hope will whet your appetite. Continue reading

THE BEST COMMENTARIES ON MATTHEW

PMW 2019-006 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

I am working on a commentary on Matt. 21:1–25:46, tentatively titled The Olivet Discourse in Context. As I engage the research, I am investigating a number of commentaries on Matthew (I do not fly by the seat of my pants as some preterist enthusiasts do!). I have found help in many of them, even when they do not hold to a preterist understanding of Olivet. Yet, several commentaries have become absolutely essential in my investigation. And I highly recommend them to my reader.

In this brief article I will recommend some good commentaries for you. If you are interested in the Olivet Discourse in particular (which is also found in Mark and Luke) or the Gospel of Matthew in general, you really need to get hold of these (legally, of course). Continue reading

THE DISCIPLES’ CONFUSION AT OLIVET (4)

PMW 2019-005 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

This is my fourth and final presentation in demonstrating that the disciples’ question to Jesus in Matt. 24:3 shows that they are confused. You might say that this is my “final judgment” on the matter.

When the disciples ask their double question in response to his short prophecy on the destruction of the temple, they bring in concepts that are not related to his prophecy. We have been seeing that they are often confused and how Jesus in the Olivet Discourse is seeking to dispel their confusion.

In the preceding article I noted that Jesus directly interacts with their confusion. In this one I will briefly demonstrate that he will clearly distinguish the events that they have merged. Continue reading

THE DISCIPLES’ CONFUSION AT OLIVET (3)

PMW 2019-004 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

This is the third installment in a four-part series on the disciples’ two questions to Jesus in Matt. 24:3: As He was sitting on the Mount of Olives, the disciples came to Him privately, saying, ‘Tell us, when will these things happen, and what will be the sign of Your coming, and of the end of the age?'”

I have been showing that throughout his ministry the disciples display confusion regarding his teaching. I believe this explains why they are confused with his short prophecy in Matt. 24:2.

You need to read the two prior articles before reading this one. I will wait a few minutes to give you the time. . . . . There, that should do it.

My previous articles

In the two previous articles I point out: Continue reading

THE DISCIPLES’ CONFUSION AT OLIVET (2)

PMW 2019-003 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

This is the second in a four-part series on the disciples’ confusion regarding Jesus’ prophecy of the temple’s destruction in Matt. 24:2. In Matt. 24:3 they ask privately: “Tell us, when will these things happen, and what will be the sign of Your coming, and of the end of the age?” It is important that we recognize that Jesus untangles their confused thoughts in the Olivet Discourse that follows. What the disciples have joined together, the Son of Man has separated, you might say.

In my forthcoming commentary on Matt. 21–25 and very briefly in this blog series, I will be explaining Jesus’ resolution to the disciples’ confusion. I will be showing that the disciples assume the destruction of the temple will occur at the end of history, the end of the age when the Final Judgment is to occur (of which he had taught them earlier, Matt. 13:39–43, 47–50). Though they claim to understand Jesus’ teaching (Matt. 13:51), Jesus will correct their error by unscrewing what to them was inscrutable. That is, though he will affirm the theological linkage of AD 70 and the Final Judgment, he will declare the historical distinction of these two events: one occurs at the beginning of Christian history, the other at the end of human history. Continue reading

THE DISCIPLES’ CONFUSION AT OLIVET (1)

PMW 2019-002 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

The Olivet Discourse is a popular and important text in eschatological discussions. Indeed, it is Jesus’ largest recorded eschatological instruction.

Unfortunately, verses can be yanked from their context and be used in a seemingly compelling construct that goes against what Christ is actually teaching. This passage in particular requires careful investigation and thoughtful deliberation. For as D. A. Carson notes (Expositor’s Bible Commentary, 8:488): “Few chapters of the Bible have called forth more disagreement among interpreters.” Sentiments such as Carson’s could be multiplied to distraction. (In fact, I am distracted just now, and will go get a Krispy Kreme doughnut. But I will return.) Continue reading