Category Archives: Temple

REV 11:2 AND ISRAEL CAST OUT (2)

Ancient synagoguePMT 2016-015 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.
In Rev 11:2 we find an important clue to the meaning of the message of Revelation. In this passage we learn that the outer court of the temple is to be cast out. The external court represents the external husk of ancient Judaism, as viewed over against the true essence of Israel. John is here reflecting on Christ’s words in Luke 21:24.

In my last blog article I began a consideration of the significance of the word “cast out” as it applies to the temple’s rejection in AD 70. This is the second installment, highlighting another concept lying behind the image. Continue reading

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SPEAKING IDOL AND JEWISH TEMPLE

PMT 2015-124 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.Priest ministering

Here in Rev the temple speaks as an image of the emperor-god. When the Pharisees rebuke Christ for not stopping those who praise him at the triumphal entry, “He answered and said, ‘I tell you, if these become silent, the stones will cry out!’” (Lk 19:40). This probably signifies that the stones of the temple will declare him when not one is left on another in AD 70 (cp. Lk 21:5-6) (See: R. C. H. Lenski, Luke, 966; E. E. Ellis, Luke [NCBC], 226). Prosopopoiia clearly appears as a major feature in the later chapters in Rev where two cities are presented as women, one an evil harlot, the other a righteous bride (Rev 17; 21). Continue reading

EZEKIEL’S TEMPLE MEASURING

Measure rodPMT 2015-121 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

I appreciate the questions readers send to me. I regret that I am not able to answer them quickly, due to my schedule. However, here is one that is a favorite among dispensationalists. And it is an intriguing one.

Reader’s question:

You argue that John must be measuring an actual, historical temple in Rev 11:1-2. Yet Ezekiel measures a temple, even though it does not exist in history. This suggests that the temple does not need to exist for John to measure it. How do you explain this problem for your view?

My response:

Thanks for your perceptive question. Please consider the following response. Continue reading

WHAT TEMPLE APPEARS IN REVELATION 11?

Temple 2PMT 2015-104 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.
Revelation is an important book in eschatological discussions. The most vigorous Revelation debate in ecclesiastical circles today revolves around the dispute between preterism and futurism. Preterism holds that Revelation was largely fulfilled not long after John wrote it. Futurism holds that it deals largely with events yet to come.

Because of this debate, the identity of the temple in Rev 11 arises as a serious matter. In Revelation 11:1, 2 we read:

And there was given me a reed like unto a rod: and the angel stood, saying, Rise, and measure the temple of God, and the altar, and them that worship therein. But the court which is without the temple leave out, and measure it not; for it is given unto the Gentiles: and the holy city shall they tread under foot forty and two months.

Here we find a Temple standing in a city called “the holy city.” Continue reading

REVELATION’S EARLY DATE (1)

Ark CovenantPMT 2015-070 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

In this two-article series, I will briefly present the basic evidence for Revelation’s pre-AD 70 composition. A preteristic understanding of Revelation is strongly (though not absolutely) linked with its early dating. And the dating of Revelation is not a theoretical assumption, but is based on exegetical evidence.

There are two basic positions on the dating of Revelation, although each has several slight variations. The current majority position is the late-date view. This view holds that the Apostle John wrote Revelation toward the close of the reign of Domitian Caesar — about A.D. 95 or 96. The minority view-point today is the early-date position. Early-date advocates hold that Revelation was written by John prior to the destruction of Jerusalem and the Temple in A.D. 70. Continue reading

ESCHATOLOGICAL DIPLOPIA?

Double visionPMT 2015-053 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

From time-to-time I get personal emails seeking answers to eschatological questions. This one is a question I hear quite frequently regarding both the Olivet Discourse and Revelation.

Question

“Thanks for the constant supply of good articles & blog posts. Here is a question for you that I thought might be a good one for a blog post sometime. If you also think so, I’d love to hear your thoughts on it.

When I’m discussing passages such as the Matthew 24: 1-34 or other related passages with dispensational friends and I’ve shown them how clearly these passages relate to the destruction of Jerusalem in 70 AD, they usually can see that its pretty clear, but unable to let go of their pet position on the subject, they often retreat into their immune fortress of … “Dual Fulfillment”. Continue reading

IS PRETERISM SPIRITUALLY DEPRESSING? (2)

Burn mountain 2PMT 2015-044 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

This is the second in a series answering a reader’s (Rick) question as to whether preterism leaves us empty and spiritually depressed (see PMT 2015-043). I did not think that telling him that I feel pretty good on most days would be all that helpful. He obviously is seriously considering the implications of preterism, and I commend him for that.

In the introductory article I presented his question, then reduced it to a series of focused observations. In this article I will consider the first implication.

What is the mountain burning with fire in Rev 8:8? That text reads: ‘The second angel sounded, and something like a great mountain burning with fire was thrown into the sea; and a third of the sea became blood.’ Preterism seems to reduce this enormous catastrophe to a relatively minor occurrence.

Continue reading