Category Archives: Theologians

INTRODUCING MILTON TERRY (2)

PMW 2021-022 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

This is the second in a two-part series introducing the life and ministry of Milton S. Terry. Terry was a scholarly advocate of both postmillennialism and preterism. Though I do not agree with all of his positions (even utterly rejecting some of them), his scholarly insights into Revelation are for the most part extremely helpful.

So let us continue, now by presenting his:

Published Writings

Terry was not only an accomplished scholar and an effective instructor, but he was also a prolific writer. He wrote extensively on apologetics, philosophy, comparative religions, and dogmatics. He wrote many articles for a variety of publications, including the Methodist Quarterly Review, The Old Testament Student, Sunday School Times, The Northwestern Christian Advocate, and others. Continue reading

INTRODUCING MILTON TERRY (1)

PMW 2021-021 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

Milton S. Terry wrote an excellent preterist commentary on Revelation. It will be released by April, 2021, as a stand-alone commentary, having been digitally extricated it from his larger work in which it was long embedded: Biblical Apocalyptics. In preparation for its release, I am providing this brief two-part biography of this remarkable scholar.

Family Background

Milton Spencer Terry was born on February 22, 1840 in the Town of Coeymans, New York. Coeymans was a small town in Albany County with a population of a little over 400 people. He died on July 13, 1914 in Los Angeles, a slightly larger town.

His father John Terry was born on March 13, 1786 in Swansea, R.I.. His mother Elizabeth McLoen (or: MacLaughlin) Terry was born on April 15, 1796 in New York City. At an early period in American history, the Terrys’ English ancestors arrived in America and settled in the New England colonies. In 1794, when John Terry was eight years, he moved with his father Philip Terry and his grandfather George Terry from Swansea to Coeymans. Continue reading

REFORMATION POSTMILLENNIALISM

PMW 2019-098 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

As Theologian Donald Bloesch notes, “postmillennialism experienced an upsurge in the middle ages,” as illustrated in the writings of Joachim of Fiore (A.D. 1145-1202) and others. But a more fully developed postmillennialism enjoys its greatest growth and influence in the seventeenth through nineteenth centuries, especially under Puritan and reformed influence in England and America.

Rodney Peterson writes that “this perspective had undergone changes, particularly since Thomas Brightman (1562-1607).” Brightman, who died in 1607, is one of the fathers of Presbyterianism in England. His postmillennial views are set forth in detail in his book A Revelation of the Revelation, which was published posthumously in 1609 and quickly established itself as one of the most widely translated works of the day. In fact, some church historians consider this work the “most important and influential English revision of the Reformed, Augustinian concept of the millennium.” Thus, Brightman stands as the modern systematizer (not creator) of postmillennialism. Continue reading

ANCIENT POSTMILLENNIAL BEGINNINGS

PMW 2019-097 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

The early creedal formulations of Christianity provide only the most rudimentary elements of eschatology. For instance, the Apostle’s Creed simply affirms:

“He ascended into heaven; and sitteth on the right hand of God the Father Almighty; from thence he shall come to judge the quick and the dead,” and a belief “in the resurrection of the body; and the life everlasting.” The eschatology of the Nicene Creed makes only very slight advances, asserting that he “ascended into heaven, and sitteth on the right hand of the Father; and he shall come again, with glory, to judge the quick and the dead; whose kingdom shall have no end.” Continue reading

CALVIN’S POSTMILLENNIALISM? (1)

PMW 2019-090 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

In this and the following ones, I will be citing John Calvin’s commentary on Isaiah 19:18–25. We find in his exposition a strong encouragement to the postmillennial hope. Before I begin citing Calvin, I will cite Isaiah since he is almost as good as Calvin! 😉 Be aware, I am citing the NASB which Calvin refused to use.

“In that day five cities in the land of Egypt will be speaking the language of Canaan and swearing allegiance to the LORD of hosts; one will be called the City of Destruction. In that day there will be an altar to the LORD in the midst of the land of Egypt, and a pillar to the LORD near its border. It will become a sign and a witness to the LORD of hosts in the land of Egypt; for they will cry to the LORD because of oppressors, and He will send them a Savior and a Champion, and He will deliver them. Thus the LORD will make Himself known to Egypt, and the Egyptians will know the LORD in that day. They will even worship with sacrifice and offering, and will make a vow to the LORD and perform it. The LORD will strike Egypt, striking but healing; so they will return to the LORD, and He will respond to them and will heal them. In that day there will be a highway from Egypt to Assyria, and the Assyrians will come into Egypt and the Egyptians into Assyria, and the Egyptians will worship with the Assyrians. In that day Israel will be the third party with Egypt and Assyria, a blessing in the midst of the earth, whom the LORD of hosts has blessed, saying, ‘Blessed is Egypt My people, and Assyria the work of My hands, and Israel My inheritance.’” (Isaiah 19:18-25 NASB).

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HOW CALVINISM BECAME A GLOBAL FAITH

PMT 2017-024 by David C. Noe (New Horizons)

“In a bold act of defiance, comparable to flag burning today, the assembled ate the sausages served by the host.” This is how D. G. Hart begins Calvinism: A History, his comprehensive social history of the branch of Protestantism most familiar to Orthodox Presbyterians, namely the Reformed faith, which takes the biblical teachings of John Calvin and others like him as its guide. The story recounts an act of Lenten rebellion that broke out in Zurich in 1522. The priest Ulrich Zwingli attended this table of discord, and a month later he preached a sermon with the title “On the Choice and Freedom of Foods.” Continue reading

CHARLES HODGE: POSTMILLENNIALIST

PMT 2013-024 by Dennis Swanson

Hodge CharlesCharles Hodge (1797–1878) has been called, “the most prominent American Presbyterian theologian of the nineteenth century” and was clearly one of the most outstanding theologians that America has ever produced. Mark Noll presents this evaluation of Hodge’s contributions:

“[Archibald] Alexander’s student Charles Hodge (1797-1878) extended this theological viewpoint into a powerful system of thought during his fifty-six years as a Princeton professor. Hodge used the same sources that Alexander had employed to defend the glory of God (instead of the happiness of humanity) as the purpose of life, to affirm the power of the Holy Spirit in salvation (against views of human self-determination), and to champion the Scriptures as the proper fount of theology (against either human religious experience or the dictates of formal reason). Hodge once remarked proudly that there had never been a new idea at Princeton, by which he meant that Princeton intended to pass on Reformed faith as it had been defined in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.”

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