SIGNIFICANCE OF TERRY’S REVELATION COMMENTARY

PMW 2021-023 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

As noted in the two previous postings, Jay Rogers and I will soon be re-publishing Milton S. Terry’s commentary on Revelation. As Christians who are deeply interested in Revelation, it is with great pleasure that we will soon be releasing it as a stand-along commentary. Since its initial composition in 1898, it has always appeared as a part of his larger volume dealing the leading apocalyptic passages in Scripture: Biblical Apocaclyptics: A Study of the Most Notable Revelations of God and of Christ in the Canonical Scriptures.. The commentary was the largest chapter in that work, consuming almost fifty percent of the book: 228 pages of its 512 pages. Continue reading

INTRODUCING MILTON TERRY (2)

PMW 2021-022 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

This is the second in a two-part series introducing the life and ministry of Milton S. Terry. Terry was a scholarly advocate of both postmillennialism and preterism. Though I do not agree with all of his positions (even utterly rejecting some of them), his scholarly insights into Revelation are for the most part extremely helpful.

So let us continue, now by presenting his:

Published Writings

Terry was not only an accomplished scholar and an effective instructor, but he was also a prolific writer. He wrote extensively on apologetics, philosophy, comparative religions, and dogmatics. He wrote many articles for a variety of publications, including the Methodist Quarterly Review, The Old Testament Student, Sunday School Times, The Northwestern Christian Advocate, and others. Continue reading

INTRODUCING MILTON TERRY (1)

PMW 2021-021 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

Milton S. Terry wrote an excellent preterist commentary on Revelation. It will be released by April, 2021, as a stand-alone commentary, having been digitally extricated it from his larger work in which it was long embedded: Biblical Apocalyptics. In preparation for its release, I am providing this brief two-part biography of this remarkable scholar.

Family Background

Milton Spencer Terry was born on February 22, 1840 in the Town of Coeymans, New York. Coeymans was a small town in Albany County with a population of a little over 400 people. He died on July 13, 1914 in Los Angeles, a slightly larger town.

His father John Terry was born on March 13, 1786 in Swansea, R.I.. His mother Elizabeth McLoen (or: MacLaughlin) Terry was born on April 15, 1796 in New York City. At an early period in American history, the Terrys’ English ancestors arrived in America and settled in the New England colonies. In 1794, when John Terry was eight years, he moved with his father Philip Terry and his grandfather George Terry from Swansea to Coeymans. Continue reading

THE GREAT COMMISSION: A POSTMILLENNIAL ENTERPRISE (4)

PMW 2021-020 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

The Great Commission truly sets forth a Great commission. It institutes a program of immense proportions, a program calling for world transformation. Christ s the discipling of all nations in all things He has taught. He lays upon His people the task of bringing all men and their cultural endeavors under the redemptive Lordship of the Triune God.

How can such a program be accomplished? Surely He did not expect it to occur over night. Millions of evangelicals teach that Christ’s coming to end history as we know it has been imminent ever since He ascended into heaven. They live by the standard of pop-theologian Hal Lindsey: “We should be living like people who don’t expect to be a round much longer.” Who would set themselves to the long, expensive, difficult, time consuming task of world transformation if he believed the world as he knows it could end at any moment? Continue reading

THE GREAT COMMISSION: A POSTMILLENNIAL ENTERPRISE (3)

PMW 2021-019 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

In my previous studies I have been analyzing the Great Commission as a foundational text for postmillennialism. In those studies I noted that the Commission revolves around four “all’s.” The first two all’s highlighted Christ’s authority as “all authority” and his directive to disciple “all nations.” In this study we will look at the third all: “all things.”

All Things

Christ commands us to disciple all nations. But what does he mean? The discipleship idea involves training in the Christian faith. The Greek word is matheteuo, which involves authority over another person so as to train them for service. In the Great Commission it is definitely redemptive in orientation, for it includes baptism in the Name of the Triune God. It is no simple humanitarianism; it is no social gospel. Continue reading

THE GREAT COMMISSION: A POSTMILLENNIAL ENTERPRISE (2)

PMW 2021-018 by by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

In my last article I began to consider the Great Commission and its implications for postmillennialism. I am highlighting the greatness of the Great Commission as a key component of the postmillennial system. My study will focus on each of the four appearances of the word “all” in the Lord’s truly Great Commission. In this study I will focus on “all authority.”

All nations

As with “all authority,” it is important that we grasp the significance of “all nations.” The word “nations” is the Greek word ethnos. It is based on the Greek word ethos, which indicates habits or customs of people; cultural relations. Thus, ethnos speaks of collected masses of men, considered as bound together by social bonds, forming a culture. Continue reading

THE GREAT COMMISSION: A POSTMILLENNIAL ENTERPRISE (1)

PMW 2021-017 by by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

One of the most beloved passages of Scripture is the Lord’s Great Commission. Most Christians know it quite well, are able to find it in the Bible, and can cite it by heart. They also instinctively love it as the command of the resurrected Lord. Unfortunately, though it is well-known, it is poorly understood. It is loved as a foundational command for Christ’s church, giving her the marching orders of the exalted Christ. But it is seldom recognized as a strong witness to the postmillennial hope which provides an optimistic outlook on history. Continue reading