ORTHODOX PRETERIST DANIEL COMMENTARY

PMW 2019-012 by Various Authors

For all those interested in eschatology, three biblical texts stand out as essential for our study: Daniel, the Olivet Discourse, and Revelation. I have written a commentary on Revelation (which should be available this Spring, 2019). I am writing a commentary on the Olivet Discourse in context, covering Matthew 21–25 (which should be available in early 2019). But regarding Daniel, I have only written a brief commentary on Daniel 9 (which is available in my book Perilous Times).

Thus, I am pleased to announce the publication of Jay Rogers’, In the Days of These Kings: The Book of Daniel in Preterist Perspective (740 pages). Rogers’ work is a fully-orthodox preterist analysis of Daniel. I highly recommend this book to my readership. Thus, in this blog article, I will list the endorsements to In the Days of These Kings, which I hope will whet your appetite.

Martin Selbrede, Vice-President, The Chalcedon Foundation
In respect to preterist studies of the Book of Daniel, I count it a very good thing that we finally have a strong, contemporary alternative to James B. Jordan’s 2007 volume with the 2018 appearance of Jay Rogers’ In the Days of These Kings.

In the nature of the case, preterist analyses are tethered to history. Whereas futurists can fantasize and speculate (and thereby tickle many ears), preterists must observe a stronger discipline that respects what God has already fixed in time, in the historic record. A preterist must not only deal with Scripture coherently, he is also on the carpet to tie the Scriptures to that historic record. Those correlations must move from being merely plausible to being formidable. A huge investment in historic research is thus required to steer the reader’s confidence in that direction. This work by Rogers is not slack in regard to meeting these challenges as it makes the preterist case. The historic research he presents is voluminous, well-organized, and easy to follow, making the volume a very strong asset that materially advances the ongoing eschatological debate.



In the Days of These Kings: The Book of Daniel in Preterist Perspective
by Jay Rogers
This orthodox preterist analysis of Daniel is not a book, but a library. Extremely helpful for the postmillennial orthodox preterist.
For more study materials, go to: KennethGentry.com/


My views don’t readily fit into the commonly-received categories that Rogers puts forward, but this is hardly a flaw of the book. Going off into the weeds to cover every doctrinal variant out there is a sure path to diminishing returns, and Rogers avoids such distractions by staying on message. Even readers like myself who differ with the author about, say, the time frame for Revelation (to take just one example) will still find tremendous benefit in his discussion of Daniel’s prophecies. The light that Rogers shines on some passages of Daniel (both in respect to cross-referencing to other scriptures and to historic events) is often decisive.

Further, it is incumbent on all students of Scripture to know all the salient positions, as put forward by their best proponents, so long as eschatology remains a matter yet to be settled once for all. For that purpose, In the Days of These Kings would be a valuable book for both advocates and opponents of preterism. It puts forward a perspective with a long and august history in the Church of Jesus Christ, a perspective that must be respected even when disagreeing with it.

I’m on record as a sympathetic critic of preterism, but I am able to commend this book whole-heartedly. I do not need to agree with every single historic correlation or scriptural parallel that Rogers makes to know that I’m holding a valuable new book in my hand, one that the Church very much needs in a day and age when men no longer endure sound doctrine. By pointing us back to the strong discipline of the past, Rogers puts our feet on firmer ground, and gives subsequent generations a stronger foundation for further advancing our understanding of this key book of the Bible.

Brian Godawa, Best-selling author, Chronicles of the Apocalypse
In The Days of These Kings is a fascinating explanation of the prophecy passages of Daniel. Jay Rogers’ explanation verse-by-verse of the detailed historical fulfillment of Daniel’s prophecies is a helpful corrective to the speculative sci-fi fantasy scenarios of modern-day prophecy pundits. He reveals Daniel’s context in relation to the other prophets of the Old Testament as well as Jesus’ Olivet Discourse and Revelation. He shows how it all fits perfectly together. This is exactly what I have been longing for in my own research. I’m telling all my readers to get this book.


Perilous Times: A Study in Eschatological Evil (by Ken Gentry)

Technical studies on Daniel’s Seventy Weeks, the great tribulation, Paul’s Man of Sin, and John’s Revelation.

See more study materials at: www.KennethGentry.com


Phillip Kayser, BiblicalBlueprints.org
I am delighted to recommend a new commentary on the book of Daniel by my friend, Jay Rogers. While I take issue with some of the conclusions he has arrived at in this difficult book, I can honestly say that it is near the top of my list of recommendations. R.J. Rushdoony once said that there are four things liberals hate about Daniel: 1) Daniel displays a sovereign God who cannot be manipulated and who destroys all who rebel against His Law-Word, including civic rulers; 2) it showcases predictive prophecy that is infallible and sure; 3) it illustrates a comprehensive Providence that governs even the tiniest details of life and history; 4) and it unapologetically presents the reality of miracles. You can judge an author by their attitude towards those four things in Daniel.

Based on that criteria, Jay Rogers stands head and shoulders above a crowd of commentaries that I possess on this book. He takes the inerrancy of Scripture seriously, takes hermeneutics seriously, submits to the New Testament’s interpretation of Daniel in a way that few evangelical commentaries do, illustrates his interpretations quite well with history, and shows how Daniel dovetails with the rest of Scripture. The reader will especially appreciate the historical background to passages that Jay provides. May this commentary receive a wide readership.

Nathan Chilton
I was blown away! My father [David Chilton] covered the book of Revelation quite thoroughly and I have been wanting to read an exposition of the book of Daniel which was also written from a preterist perspective.

Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.
Jay Rogers has not provided us with a book on the preterist understanding of Daniel. He has provided us with a library on the topic! This meticulously researched and thorough treatment of Daniel from a preterist perspective includes over 700 pages of commentary on Daniel, its historical background and setting, New Testament allusions, and much more. It is enhanced with charts, tables, maps, and illustrations, and topped off with helpful, thorough indexes. A valuable work for anyone interested in Daniel. Don’t wait for the movie: get this book today!


JESUS, MATTHEW, AND OLIVET
I am currently researching a commentary on Matthew 21–25, the literary context of the Olivet Discourse from Matthew’s perspective. My research will demonstrate that Matthew’s presentation demands that the Olivet Discourse refer to AD 70 (Matt. 24:3–35) as an event that anticipates the Final Judgment at the Second Advent (Matt. 24:36–25:46). This will explode the myth that Jesus was a Jewish sage focusing only on Israel. The commentary will be about 250 pages in length.

If you would like to support me in my research, I invite you to consider giving a tax-deductible contribution to my research and writing ministry: GoodBirth Ministries. Your help is much appreciated!

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3 thoughts on “ORTHODOX PRETERIST DANIEL COMMENTARY

  1. Stephen February 8, 2019 at 9:25 am

    Would you have a recommendation on the book of Zechariah?

  2. Kenneth Gentry February 8, 2019 at 11:25 am

    I like the brief commentary in Francis Davidson, New Bible Commentary (2d ed).

  3. Erik Nelson (@ErikNel98388100) February 10, 2019 at 6:10 am

    The Temple of Herod was 46 years old at Jesus’ first Passover (John 2:20) which may relate to the Pharisees mocking Jesus about not being 50 years old (John 8:57)

    Offer that shows that the monumental & historically significant Temple of Herod = Daniel’s “seven sevens” after the “62 sevens” (with the final single “seven” being the Jewish War from 66-73 AD)

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