Tag Archives: six day creation

IN THE SPACE OF SIX PAGES (3)

god-and-creationPMW 2020-072 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

In this article I am concluding a three-part study of a Reformed writer’s attempt to re-interpret the Westminster Confession of Faith’s statement on six day creation. The paper I am critiquing was written by Dr. Lee Irons.

Irons complains: “assuming that these men almost universally held to a young earth, logically we cannot conclude that the Confession itself affirms or requires the young earth position.” In response we should note:

(1) Irons’ choice of terms unfortunately tends to bias his readers against Hall’s work: once again he speaks of “assuming” something. Hall does not assume the young earth perspective of the divines: he provides what Irons himself calls “a catalogue of quotes”; that is, he documents their views. Continue reading

IN THE SPACE OF SIX PAGES (2)

six-daysPMW 2020-071 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

This is the second in a three-part series on the creation statement in the Westminster Confession of Faith. Six-day creation is an embarrassment to many evangelical and Reformed theologians. It is such an embarrassment that some will even re-interpret historic Reformed statements on the matter. One such re-working of the meaning of the Confession has been attempted by Reformed theological writer Lee Irons. Let’s continue my critique of his effort.

Irons opens his actual response to Hall’s research in the writings of the Westminster divines with this rather surprising comment, a comment that exposes a fundamental flaw in Irons’ effort: Continue reading

IN THE SPACE OF SIX PAGES (1)

creation-beginningPMW 2020-070 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

The power of God and the clarity of his revelation are on trial in the courtroom of Reformed theological opinion. Despite the clarity of the statement on creation in the venerable Westminster Confession of Faith, some theologians attempt to re-interpret it to allow for evolution. In this three part series I will analyze one effort to this end.

Lee Irons has provided us with a Framework Interpretation response to David Hall’s important speech to the PCA General Assembly a few years back. In that speech Hall dealt with the Confessional meaning of creation “in the space of six days.” In his response titled “In the Space of Six Days: What Did the Divines Mean?”1 Irons mounts a vigorous assault on Hall’s historical research into the original meaning of the Confession of Faith’s statement. Continue reading

IS SIX-DAY CREATION NAIVE FUNDAMENTALISM?

PMW 2020-069 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

Many academic evangelicals decry Six-day Creation as naive fundamentalism. They reject it as beneath the dignity of serious exegetical theology. Of course, this is quite mistaken. For a compelling, sophisticated exegetical argument can be made in defense of this view.

As a Reformed Christian trained in exegetical theology, I do not tenaciously hold to an approach to Scripture more in keeping with a “naive fundamentalism.” Rather my view of creation continues an exegetical tradition with a well-argued, long-standing, traditional orthodoxy — an orthodoxy including many noteworthy biblical and exegetical scholars from the past and the present.

Though counting noses is not the way to argue a theological point, I do want to point to many world-class scholars who have held and continue to hold to Six-day Creation. Continue reading

MY CREATIONIST TESTIMONY

PMW 2018-068 interview by Lita Cosner

Note: This interview of me was conducted and published by Creation Ministries, International. I have a strong interest in and commitment to Six-day Creation as an important feature of the biblical worldview. The interview was conducted by Lita Cosner, Information Officer for CMI.

Dr Ken Gentry has recently retired from the pastorate after 37 years of ministry in conservative, evangelical Presbyterian churches. He has been married to his wife, Melissa, since 1971. They have three grown children who are all Christians, and six grandchildren. Continue reading

NEW CREATIONIST APOLOGETICS MINISTRY

PMT 2017-088 by Jason Lisle (Biblical Science Institute)

[Gentry introductory note: As one who is committed to the biblical worldview, I am not only a postmillennialist but a Six-day Creationist. Both of these positions flow directly from Scripture. Creationism is not only an important issue in itself, but also an excellent apologetics tool. Dr. Jason Lisle has begun a new ministry called “Biblical Science Institute.” Dr. Lisle is a Van Til presuppositionalist and an excellent scientist, being an astrophysicist. I highly recommend it to those interested not only in Six-day Creation but also apologetics.]

Friends of the Biblical Science Institute, thank you for your interest in defending the Christian Faith. In our second month of operation, we have a number of exciting new faith-affirming resources. We were able to document the August 21 Solar Eclipse; this was the first transcontinental eclipse over North America in 99 years. We traveled to the path of totality to experience this amazing event first hand, and have compiled an online video to share this experience with you. We hope you enjoy it! We are so grateful that the Lord granted us traveling mercies, and clear skies. We also posted a new web article describing eclipses and their relevance to creation. Continue reading

CREATION AND CONSUMMATION (3)

Slow growthPMT-2016-020 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

As I have been noting in this series: creation and consummation are theologically-linked in Scripture. Therefore, a proper view of creation is significant for the eschatological argument for postmillennialism. Simply put: if you do not begin right, you will not end right. Therefore, when I present a full argument for postmillennialism, I begin with creation.

Not only am I a postmillennialist, but I am also a Six-day Creationist, hence a non-evolutionist.
In this series I am defending Six-day Creation against the Framework Hypothesis by demonstrating the Framework’s errors. This hypothesis is as a major evangelical opponent of Six-day Creation, and not surprisingly, is held mainly by amillennialists. Continue reading