Tag Archives: Matthew 24

ORTHODOX PRETERISM AND LUKE 17

PMW 2017-126 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

From time-to-time I receive inquiries regarding the relationship of Luke 17 and Matthew 24. This is generally prompted by orthodox Christians who have been challenged by Hyper-preterists. Thus, it is important for the protection and promotion of evangelical orthodoxy to return to this question when needed.

I argue in several places in my writings, that Matthew 24 is answering two questions from the disciples. They assume the destruction of the temple means the destruction of the world (Matt 24:1–3). But Jesus separates the destruction of the temple from the second coming and the end of history. We see him drawing a line between the two events between verses 34 and 36 in Matt 24. Continue reading

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DOES OLIVET POINT TO AD 70? Part 2

Roman attack JerusalemPMT 2014-137 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

In my previous article (PMT 2014-135) I began a brief (two-part) argument that the first portion of the Olivet Discourse focuses on the destruction of the Jewish temple in AD 70. If you have not read that article, I encourage you to do so before reading this one.

Now we are ready to briefly summarize the evidence for an AD 70 occurrence of the first portion of the Lord’s Olivet Discourse. So then, without further delay, consider the following;

First, in Matt 23:1–33 Jesus issues a long and biting denunciation of the first-century Pharisees. These were the spiritual heroes of the common man and the constant nemeses of the Son of Man. He delivers a seven-fold woe against them here, toward the end of his earthly ministry (Matt 23:13, 15, 16, 23, 25, 27, 29 — Matt 23:14 is textually precarious). Continue reading

DOES OLIVET POINT TO AD 70? (Part 1)

Olivet and DisciplesPMT 2014-136 by Kenneth L. Gentry, Jr.

The Olivet Discourse is an important key to New Testament prophecy. It is found in the three Synoptic Gospels at Matt 24–25; Mark 13; and Luke 21. I believe also that John’s Gospel does not have it because John re-casts it in dramatic, symbolic imagery in his Book of Revelation. After all, John titles his great prophetic work: “The Revelation of Jesus Christ” (Rev 1:1). And it certainly reflects the Olivet Discourse in a number of places (e.g., cp. Luke 21:24 with Rev 11:2; Matt 23:35 with Rev 18:24).

This Discourse is the Lord’s climactic prophecy which he gives not long before his public rejection by Israel (Matt 23:37), condemnation by her high-priestly aristocracy (Matt 26:65–66), and crucifixion at the insistence of that legal body (Matt 27:1–2, 12, 20–22). In Jesus’ ministry, several distinct prophecies lead up to this grand finale; but this is clearly his most focused and sustained prophecy from his teaching ministry. Continue reading